MEMORY TRAINI NG Being able to remember things is really important in networking. I speak from personal experience here as I realised a while back that I’m not good at recognising faces. It’s not quite the neurological condition called prosopagnosia, which makes it almost impossible, but I do often have to resort to ‘strategies’ in order to connect names and faces. I’ll tell you my strategy later on in this chapter but you might like to answer these three questions first: Do you think your memory has become a little worse over the years? Do you find there are some things you can remember easily, while you’re more likely to forget others? Do you already use any specific techniques for remembering things? There are lots of ways of improving your memory and I’ll cover a few of them here, but one of the most useful things you can do is to intend to remember. Simply putting that idea in your mind will make it more possible. And regarding information, rather than people, until you are confident that you will remember the information that you need, it’s probably best to make notes. Jotting down brief detail of things, as soon as you can, will help you retain information. So after meeting someone new, if they give you their business card you should write on it the place and date you met them, and any specific things that will jog your memory later – for example an interest they mentioned, or another group of which they’re a member. However, it’s not always possible, or appropriate, to take notes, so it’s useful to have some strategies for memorising and recalling information; here are a few useful ones. Repetiti o n It’s helpful to repeat information to yourself in your head as you hear it, or out loud if appropriate. To move information into your long term memory it helps to repeat it lots of times. Try a few times in immediate succession and then again a day later, and again a week later and again a month later. Until you’re confident in your memory, it’s best to make notes and jot down brief details of things as soon as you can. If you can’t write something down, here are a few more things that can help. As s ociat ion By associating one piece of information with another, you can make it easier to recall. I once had a neighbour, whose name I always remembered, but I tended to forget the names of her husband and daughter. The daughter's name was Vicki, and she had a turned-up nose. I recalled that, as a child, there was a product called Vick, an ointment that was put on your chest if you had a blocked-up nose, so you could breathe more easily. I thought that if you had Vick spread on your chest, your nose would probably turn up if it could. So I remembered the girl's name by seeing her nose and recalling the association with Vick ointment. The husband's name was, Andrew, so I thought, when I saw his wife: ‘It's her and who . .oh yes, Andrew ’. So I used a rhyme as the association there. I have now forgotten my neighbour's name, but still recall the name of her husband and daughter because I made a point of making those associations at the time. I saw his wife: ‘It's her and who . .oh yes, Andrew ’. So I used a rhyme as the association there. I have now forgotten my neighbour's name, but still recall the name of her husband and daughter because I made a point of making those associations at the time. To use this technique for remembering names, just find a physical feature of the person and associate it with something else. Make sure you only use a characteristic which persists through time; mouth or ear shapes are good, but hair colour or the shape of glasses aren’t because they can change over time. Humour By making a situation seem funny, it can be easier to remember. Suppose you’re speaking to someone and recall something you need to do on your way home perhaps pick up a bottle of milk. You could imagine a huge bottle of milk suspended over your car with the milk pouring out all over the windscreen. When you get back to your car you should remember the image and then be able to get the milk on your way back. Be as imaginative as you can with this; it really helps with recall. E xa ggera t ion Exaggeration is another aid to memory. Suppose you want to remember which platform your train departs from. Just imagine the platform number as if it were a firework display; see the number lit up with colourful flares, hear the sound of the fireworks as they fizz and pop. Really make the scene as bright, huge and exciting as you can. You should remember the platform number and may well take some of the excitement of the firework display onto the train with you as well. Telling s to r ies This technique is really useful for remembering lists, or sequences, of items. Here’s a list of a few things you might want to buy: Oranges Newspaper Some paint Milk Postage stamps And here’s a little story you could create to remember those things: There was an old tree that hadn’t borne fruit for many years. Nobody could remember the last time. But, one day, there it was bedecked with oranges hanging from every branch. However, when people looked closer, they found they weren’t real oranges, but just ones made of newspap er which had been painted to look like oranges. One orange was bigger than the others though – almost the size of a large melon, and, when people looked at that one, they saw it had a little pane of glass and you could look through it and, inside the orange, was a small bottle of milk. On the bottle was a label with an address and a huge postage stamp but how the milk got into the bottle nobody knew. The story contains all the items on the shopping list and, once you get into the habit of making up little stories like this, you’ll find that lists are easier to remember; the technique works really well. And you can use this kind of story to remember things to tell people at meetings if you don’t want to carry notes with you. Mnem onics In this case, you use the first letters of the items you want to remember to create a word, then use the word to help you remember the original list. For example, the word HORSE could remind you to buy: Honey Olives Rhubarb Sugar Eggs Or at a networking meeting, the word MOST could remind you of the points you want to make in a one-minute presentation: Me (tell people your name) Offer (tell people what you produce or supply) Special (tell people what’s different about the benefits you give) Try (tell people they can have a discount voucher today) I said I’d come back to my own strategy for remembering people, so here it is and it uses a kind of mnemonic too: I use the letters L,S,D ( which may have one or two associations for people of a certain age). L = Look (at the person), Listen (to their name) and Link (their name to something you know about) S = See (their face in your mind), Suss (them out for something – find something about them to associate with their name), Say (their name out loud) D = Do (it again if necessary – ie repeat the process until you are clear about their name) Extract from Ne tworking for Success by Carol Harris
                
Back to Previous Page
Back to Previous Page
MEMORY TRAINI NG Being able to remember things is really important in networking. I speak from personal experience here as I realised a while back that I’m not good at recognising faces. It’s not quite the neurological condition called prosopagnosia, which makes it almost impossible, but I do often have to resort to ‘strategies’ in order to connect names and faces. I’ll tell you my strategy later on in this chapter but you might like to answer these three questions first: Do you think your memory has become a little worse over the years? Do you find there are some things you can remember easily, while you’re more likely to forget others? Do you already use any specific techniques for remembering things? There are lots of ways of improving your memory and I’ll cover a few of them here, but one of the most useful things you can do is to intend to remember. Simply putting that idea in your mind will make it more possible. And regarding information, rather than people, until you are confident that you will remember the information that you need, it’s probably best to make notes. Jotting down brief detail of things, as soon as you can, will help you retain information. So after meeting someone new, if they give you their business card you should write on it the place and date you met them, and any specific things that will jog your memory later – for example an interest they mentioned, or another group of which they’re a member. However, it’s not always possible, or appropriate, to take notes, so it’s useful to have some strategies for memorising and recalling information; here are a few useful ones. Repetiti o n It’s helpful to repeat information to yourself in your head as you hear it, or out loud if appropriate. To move information into your long term memory it helps to repeat it lots of times. Try a few times in immediate succession and then again a day later, and again a week later and again a month later. Until you’re confident in your memory, it’s best to make notes and jot down brief details of things as soon as you can. If you can’t write something down, here are a few more things that can help. As s ociat ion By associating one piece of information with another, you can make it easier to recall. I once had a neighbour, whose name I always remembered, but I tended to forget the names of her husband and daughter. The daughter's name was Vicki, and she had a turned-up nose. I recalled that, as a child, there was a product called Vick, an ointment that was put on your chest if you had a blocked-up nose, so you could breathe more easily. I thought that if you had Vick spread on your chest, your nose would probably turn up if it could. So I remembered the girl's name by seeing her nose and recalling the association with Vick ointment. The husband's name was, Andrew, so I thought, when I saw his wife: ‘It's her and who . .oh yes, Andrew ’. So I used a rhyme as the association there. I have now forgotten my neighbour's name, but still recall the name of her husband and daughter because I made a point of making those associations at the time. I saw his wife: ‘It's her and who . .oh yes, Andrew ’. So I used a rhyme as the association there. I have now forgotten my neighbour's name, but still recall the name of her husband and daughter because I made a point of making those associations at the time. To use this technique for remembering names, just find a physical feature of the person and associate it with something else. Make sure you only use a characteristic which persists through time; mouth or ear shapes are good, but hair colour or the shape of glasses aren’t because they can change over time. Humour By making a situation seem funny, it can be easier to remember. Suppose you’re speaking to someone and recall something you need to do on your way home perhaps pick up a bottle of milk. You could imagine a huge bottle of milk suspended over your car with the milk pouring out all over the windscreen. When you get back to your car you should remember the image and then be able to get the milk on your way back. Be as imaginative as you can with this; it really helps with recall. E xa ggera t ion Exaggeration is another aid to memory. Suppose you want to remember which platform your train departs from. Just imagine the platform number as if it were a firework display; see the number lit up with colourful flares, hear the sound of the fireworks as they fizz and pop. Really make the scene as bright, huge and exciting as you can. You should remember the platform number and may well take some of the excitement of the firework display onto the train with you as well. Telling s to r ies This technique is really useful for remembering lists, or sequences, of items. Here’s a list of a few things you might want to buy: Oranges Newspaper Some paint Milk Postage stamps And here’s a little story you could create to remember those things: There was an old tree that hadn’t borne fruit for many years. Nobody could remember the last time. But, one day, there it was bedecked with oranges hanging from every branch. However, when people looked closer, they found they weren’t real oranges, but just ones made of newspap er which had been painted to look like oranges. One orange was bigger than the others though – almost the size of a large melon, and, when people looked at that one, they saw it had a little pane of glass and you could look through it and, inside the orange, was a small bottle of milk. On the bottle was a label with an address and a huge postage stamp but how the milk got into the bottle nobody knew. The story contains all the items on the shopping list and, once you get into the habit of making up little stories like this, you’ll find that lists are easier to remember; the technique works really well. And you can use this kind of story to remember things to tell people at meetings if you don’t want to carry notes with you. Mnem onics In this case, you use the first letters of the items you want to remember to create a word, then use the word to help you remember the original list. For example, the word HORSE could remind you to buy: Honey Olives Rhubarb Sugar Eggs Me (tell people your name) Offer (tell people what you produce or supply) Special (tell people what’s different about the benefits Try (tell people they can have a discount voucher Extract from Ne tworking for Success by Carol Harris
       