TIPS SHEET ON VIDEO CONFERENCES 1 SAVE LINKS IN A DEDICATED FOLDER If you keep all your video links in one place it will be easy to check you have them and they will also be easy to retrieve. 2 GET ON TO CALLS IN GOOD TIME Whether you are hosting the call or simply attending, allow time to arrive. It’s just like a ‘face to face’ meeting; being on time – and preferably a bit early – is just good manners. And allowing extra time will help if there are any technical hitches on the day. 3 CONSIDER YOUR APPEARANCE This includes your clothes, hair, surroundings or virtual background, any ‘props’ you want to use or have visible etc. 4 HAVE SOMETHING TO WRITE ON You may well want to make notes as the call goes on. Consider whether you’ll do this on paper or on your screen, or on another screen. And if you’re using paper make sure you have space and a hard surface to rest on. 5 WORK OUT WHAT YOU WANT TO SAY If the event needs you to do a short input (talking about yourself, your business, the topic of the event or anything else) it’s useful to work out in advance what you’d like to say. If necessary make some notes on this, but do avoid speaking from a ‘script’ as it’s likely to come across as stilted and detached. 6 SHARE OUT THE CONVERSATION If you’re on a call, then treat it as any other interaction between people. If you’re speaking, look at the camera if possible, use appropriate facial expressions rather than having a fixed stare and speak for an appropriate length – don’t hog the conversation and, as importantly, avoid sitting for the entire time without making any contribution at all. 6 USE THE CHAT FUNCTION SENSIBLY The chat facility is really useful, but remember to use it appropriately. Avoid putting lengthy information there as people are unlikely to read it all. Do put clickable links rather than just names of sites. Do check in case anyone has sent you a personal message (and this is even more important if you are the host). And reply to messages as quickly as you can. Remember chat can usually be saved (in Zoom it’s via the three tiny black dots on the bottom right of the screen). 7 BE A LEADER IF APPROPRIATE If, for whatever reason, nobody is taking a lead at an event, consider doing so yourself. This might mean saying hello to anyone who is joining, asking people a bit about themselves, suggesting a topic of conversation etc. Sometimes the intended leader hasn’t arrived or simply isn’t managing the event well and it’s useful if you have the skills to step in (without dominating the proceedings). 8 CHECK ANY ACTION REQUIRED Before leaving the event, make sure you and any others involved, are clear on any action to be taken after the meeting. 9 FOLLOW UP IN A TIMELY MANNER If there are any actions you need to take after the event, do these quickly where possible. This includes arranging follow-up meetings with people, providing information that’s been requested etc. 10 KEEP RECORDS It’s really useful to record where you met people, what action was needed, dates of future meetings etc. It’s easy to forget some of this and good records will make your events much more memorable. Carol Harris
TIPS SHEET ON VIDEO CONFERENCES 1 SAVE LINKS IN A DEDICATED FOLDER If you keep all your video links in one place it will be easy to check you have them and they will also be easy to retrieve. 2 GET ON TO CALLS IN GOOD TIME Whether you are hosting the call or simply attending, allow time to arrive. It’s just like a ‘face to face’ meeting; being on time – and preferably a bit early – is just good manners. And allowing extra time will help if there are any technical hitches on the day. 3 CONSIDER YOUR APPEARANCE This includes your clothes, hair, surroundings or virtual background, any ‘props’ you want to use or have visible etc. 4 HAVE SOMETHING TO WRITE ON You may well want to make notes as the call goes on. Consider whether you’ll do this on paper or on your screen, or on another screen. And if you’re using paper make sure you have space and a hard surface to rest on. 5 WORK OUT WHAT YOU WANT TO SAY If the event needs you to do a short input (talking about yourself, your business, the topic of the event or anything else) it’s useful to work out in advance what you’d like to say. If necessary make some notes on this, but do avoid speaking from a ‘script’ as it’s likely to come across as stilted and detached. 6 SHARE OUT THE CONVERSATION If you’re on a call, then treat it as any other interaction between people. If you’re speaking, look at the camera if possible, use appropriate facial expressions rather than having a fixed stare and speak for an appropriate length – don’t hog the conversation and, as importantly, avoid sitting for the entire time without making any contribution at all. 6 USE THE CHAT FUNCTION SENSIBLY The chat facility is really useful, but remember to use it appropriately. Avoid putting lengthy information there as people are unlikely to read it all. Do put clickable links rather than just names of sites. Do check in case anyone has sent you a personal message (and this is even more important if you are the host). And reply to messages as quickly as you can. Remember chat can usually be saved (in Zoom it’s via the three tiny black dots on the bottom right of the screen). 7 BE A LEADER IF APPROPRIATE If, for whatever reason, nobody is taking a lead at an event, consider doing so yourself. This might mean saying hello to anyone who is joining, asking people a bit about themselves, suggesting a topic of conversation etc. Sometimes the intended leader hasn’t arrived or simply isn’t managing the event well and it’s useful if you have the skills to step in (without dominating the proceedings). 8 CHECK ANY ACTION REQUIRED Before leaving the event, make sure you and any others involved, are clear on any action to be taken after the meeting. 9 FOLLOW UP IN A TIMELY MANNER If there are any actions you need to take after the event, do these quickly where possible. This includes arranging follow-up meetings with people, providing information that’s been requested etc. 10 KEEP RECORDS It’s really useful to record where you met people, what action was needed, dates of future meetings etc. It’s easy to forget some of this and good records will make your events much more memorable. Carol Harris
TIPS SHEET ON VIDEO CONFERENCES 1 SAVE LINKS IN A DEDICATED FOLDER If you keep all your video links in one place it will be easy to check you have them and they will also be easy to retrieve. 2 GET ON TO CALLS IN GOOD TIME Whether you are hosting the call or simply attending, allow time to arrive. It’s just like a ‘face to face’ meeting; being on time – and preferably a bit early – is just good manners. And allowing extra time will help if there are any technical hitches on the day. 3 CONSIDER YOUR APPEARANCE This includes your clothes, hair, surroundings or virtual background, any ‘props’ you want to use or have visible etc. 4 HAVE SOMETHING TO WRITE ON You may well want to make notes as the call goes on. Consider whether you’ll do this on paper or on your screen, or on another screen. And if you’re using paper make sure you have space and a hard surface to rest on. 5 WORK OUT WHAT YOU WANT TO SAY If the event needs you to do a short input (talking about yourself, your business, the topic of the event or anything else) it’s useful to work out in advance what you’d like to say. If necessary make some notes on this, but do avoid speaking from a ‘script’ as it’s likely to come across as stilted and detached. 6 SHARE OUT THE CONVERSATION If you’re on a call, then treat it as any other interaction between people. If you’re speaking, look at the camera if possible, use appropriate facial expressions rather than having a fixed stare and speak for an appropriate length – don’t hog the conversation and, as importantly, avoid sitting for the entire time without making any contribution at all. 6 USE THE CHAT FUNCTION SENSIBLY The chat facility is really useful, but remember to use it appropriately. Avoid putting lengthy information there as people are unlikely to read it all. Do put clickable links rather than just names of sites. Do check in case anyone has sent you a personal message (and this is even more important if you are the host). And reply to messages as quickly as you can. Remember chat can usually be saved (in Zoom it’s via the three tiny black dots on the bottom right of the screen). 7 BE A LEADER IF APPROPRIATE If, for whatever reason, nobody is taking a lead at an event, consider doing so yourself. This might mean saying hello to anyone who is joining, asking people a bit about themselves, suggesting a topic of conversation etc. Sometimes the intended leader hasn’t arrived or simply isn’t managing the event well and it’s useful if you have the skills to step in (without dominating the proceedings). 8 CHECK ANY ACTION REQUIRED Before leaving the event, make sure you and any others involved, are clear on any action to be taken after the meeting. 9 FOLLOW UP IN A TIMELY MANNER If there are any actions you need to take after the event, do these quickly where possible. This includes arranging follow-up meetings with people, providing information that’s been requested etc. 10 KEEP RECORDS It’s really useful to record where you met people, what action was needed, dates of future meetings etc. It’s easy to forget some of this and good records will make your events much more memorable. Carol Harris