Make your objective positive (what you want to achieve – not what you want to get away from). For example – ‘being relaxed’, rather than ‘not being stressed’. Make sure your objective is within your control (to do with your own behaviour, thoughts or feelings rather than someone else’s). For example ‘being able to handle someone’s criticism, rather than ‘that person not criticising you’. Consider the context (specify what you mean by your objective). For example – ‘I want to be better organised, WHICH MEANS having all my data easily retrievable, all my books on shelves and all my business stationery readily accessible. Think about the pros and cons of achieving your objective and also the pros and cons of not achieving it (there are likely to be upsides and downsides to both scenarios and they may differ, so it’s important to work through all of them). Make sure you can measure your results (and include various kinds of measure including sensory measures, such as what you might see, hear or feel when you achieve your objective, as well as more conventional ways of quantifying success). Check the ‘level’ of success you need (make sure you’re aiming for an appropriate result, rather than simply a step on the way or unnecessary perfection) Ensure you have the necessary resources to achieve your objective (eg time, energy, finance, materials, equipment, people etc). Think about the wider consequences of achieving your objective (effect on other people, ethics etc). Check that your objective fits with who you are (if achieving your objective would radically change you, or change how you are perceived by others, you need to be comfortable with that outcome).
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Here’s a short outline of the NLP (Neuro-Linguistic Programming) approach to objective setting. If you’d like to know more about this, or would like an individual or team session to learn how to apply this, do get in touch.
NINE NLP TIPS FOR EFFECTIVE OBJECTIVE SETTING
Make your objective positive (what you want to achieve – not what you want to get away from). For example – ‘being relaxed’, rather than ‘not being stressed’. Make sure your objective is within your control (to do with your own behaviour, thoughts or feelings rather than someone else’s). For example ‘being able to handle someone’s criticism, rather than ‘that person not criticising you’. Consider the context (specify what you mean by your objective). For example – ‘I want to be better organised, WHICH MEANS having all my data easily retrievable, all my books on shelves and all my business stationery readily accessible. Think about the pros and cons of achieving your objective and also the pros and cons of not achieving it (there are likely to be upsides and downsides to both scenarios and they may differ, so it’s important to work through all of them). Make sure you can measure your results (and include various kinds of measure including sensory measures, such as what you might see, hear or feel when you achieve your objective, as well as more conventional ways of quantifying success). Check the ‘level’ of success you need (make sure you’re aiming for an appropriate result, rather than simply a step on the way or unnecessary perfection) Ensure you have the necessary resources to achieve your objective (eg time, energy, finance, materials, equipment, people etc). Think about the wider consequences of achieving your objective (effect on other people, ethics etc). Check that your objective fits with who you are (if achieving your objective would radically change you, or change how you are perceived by others, you need to be comfortable with that outcome).
· · · · · · · · ·
NINE NLP TIPS FOR EFFECTIVE OBJECTIVE SETTING
Here’s a short outline of the NLP (Neuro-Linguistic Programming) approach to objective setting. If you’d like to know more about this, or would like an individual or team session to learn how to apply this, do get in touch.
Make your objective positive (what you want to achieve – not what you want to get away from). For example – ‘being relaxed’, rather than ‘not being stressed’. Make sure your objective is within your control (to do with your own behaviour, thoughts or feelings rather than someone else’s). For example ‘being able to handle someone’s criticism, rather than ‘that person not criticising you’. Consider the context (specify what you mean by your objective). For example – ‘I want to be better organised, WHICH MEANS having all my data easily retrievable, all my books on shelves and all my business stationery readily accessible. Think about the pros and cons of achieving your objective and also the pros and cons of not achieving it (there are likely to be upsides and downsides to both scenarios and they may differ, so it’s important to work through all of them). Make sure you can measure your results (and include various kinds of measure including sensory measures, such as what you might see, hear or feel when you achieve your objective, as well as more conventional ways of quantifying success). Check the ‘level’ of success you need (make sure you’re aiming for an appropriate result, rather than simply a step on the way or unnecessary perfection) Ensure you have the necessary resources to achieve your objective (eg time, energy, finance, materials, equipment, people etc). Think about the wider consequences of achieving your objective (effect on other people, ethics etc). Check that your objective fits with who you are (if achieving your objective would radically change you, or change how you are perceived by others, you need to be comfortable with that outcome).
· · · · · · · · ·
NINE NLP TIPS FOR EFFECTIVE OBJECTIVE SETTING
Here’s a short outline of the NLP (Neuro-Linguistic Programming) approach to objective setting. If you’d like to know more about this, or would like an individual or team session to learn how to apply this, do get in touch.